Toyota 4WD Surf Owners • View topic - Adjusting bi-metal strip on viscous fan

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 Post subject: Adjusting bi-metal strip on viscous fan
PostPosted: Mon Feb 05, 2007 2:59 am 
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My viscous fan never kicks in. It still has good drag via the viscous coupling, but the bi-metal switch never clicks on.

I've done heaps of research on the forum and there is plenty of information on changing the silicon fluid, but nothing on how to adjust the bi-metal switch.

Some posters mentioned adjusting it to kick in earlier at a bit cooler temperatures, but nobody explained how to do it. There doesn't appear to be an external adjustment, is there an internal adjustment?


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Feb 05, 2007 7:11 am 
Terry,

I found this. After reading it, it would appear to be something to be either shortened or heat treated on one side to soften or harden it.

Thermostatic Bimetallic Spring Coil
The thermal viscous fan drive is a silicone-fluid-filled coupling used to connect the fan blades to the water pump shaft. The coupling allows the fan to be driven in a normal manner. This is done at low engine speeds while limiting the top speed of the fan to a predetermined maximum level at higher engine speeds.

A thermostatic bimetallic spring coil is located on the front face of the viscous fan drive unit (a typical viscous unit is shown in the picture below). This spring coil reacts to the temperature of the radiator discharge air. It engages the viscous fan drive for higher fan speed if the air temperature from the radiator rises above a certain point. Until additional engine cooling is necessary, the fan will remain at a reduced rpm regardless of engine speed.

Only when sufficient heat is present, will the viscous fan drive engage. This is when the air flowing through the radiator core causes a reaction to the bimetallic coil. It then increases fan speed to provide the necessary additional engine cooling.

Once the engine has cooled, the radiator discharge temperature will drop. The bimetallic coil again reacts and the fan speed is reduced to the previous disengaged speed.


Image

Let us know how you go.

Jez


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Feb 05, 2007 8:52 am 
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You seperate the two halves of the clutch assy and inside is a sliding type adjustment for the bi-metal strip.
So the answer to your question is remove the clutch,seperate the two halves and adjust from the inside.
Been years since i done mine and i cant remember where i set mine...sorry.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Feb 05, 2007 9:01 am 
parrasurfa wrote:
remove the clutch,seperate the two halves and adjust from the inside.


So Parra, Terry, anyone, does that mean the info I found in relation to the thermostatic bimetallic spring coil is not relevant to the Surf fan unit?

I haven't looked at a Surf one for over a year and forget what they look like. However, I do remember the Ford Falcon units I played with 10 or more years ago looked exactly like the one in the above picture.

Jez


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 Post subject: Adjustment
PostPosted: Mon Feb 05, 2007 2:33 pm 
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Jez, mine is a Hilux truck, but I expect the clutch to be similar. It looks like the drawing Parra posted.

Parra, thanks for the information. I'll open it up and have a play with setting the temperature that it engages at. Once I have the setting right, then I'll pull it apart one more time to change the fluid.

It would have been so easy for the factory to design a pre-load screw on the end of the spring so it could have been adjusted externally...


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Feb 05, 2007 2:41 pm 
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These pics will help you to see how its adjusted...look at the one where its seperated in half.
They are not my pics so thanks to the poster for them.

http://www.toyotasurf.asn.au/forum/view ... ht=bimetal

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 Post subject: Amount of fluid
PostPosted: Mon Feb 05, 2007 2:56 pm 
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Thanks, I'll have to wait until it is apart to see how it actually functions. By the way, how much fluid did you end up putting back in the housing? There has been discussion that instead of 50ml, that only 1 and a half tubes be put back in.

When I complete this job, I'll write up how it is done and post it so that others will have a better starting point than me.


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 Post subject: Clutch fan ok
PostPosted: Wed Feb 07, 2007 5:54 pm 
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After doing some testing I determined that the clutch on the fan was operating correctly. When the radiator is hot, I can rev the engine and the fan accelerates with the pulley. Gives quite a blast of air when your under the bonnet.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Feb 15, 2007 5:41 am 
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I know the info's irrelevant now, :D but inside the fan unit, the friction plate has two screws holding it in position. You loosen those two screws and adjust the plate clockwise or counter clockwise, depending on whether you wish to raise or lower the bite point.

Edit: Borrowed this pic from the other thread to show. It's the two screws in the yellow circles.

Image


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 Post subject: Adjustment
PostPosted: Fri Feb 16, 2007 8:13 pm 
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Matt, thanks for the picture and the explanation. OK, so if you want the clutch to engage at a lower temperature do you shift the plate clockwise or counterclockwise?

I am assuming that the plate is resting on some sort of incline plane that moves it closer or further from the other plate when you adjust it, is this correct?

If adjusting the gap between the plates is what is occurring, does decreasing this gap bring in the fan clutch at a lower temperature?

Can the fan clutch be tested using hot water? That is, if I was to immerse the clutch hub in a tub of water on the stove, with a thermometer, would I be able to determine at what temperature the clutch locked up?

And lastly, at what temperature is the clutch designed to lock up?


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Feb 16, 2007 10:02 pm 
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Terry I would assume the clutch would engage close to 85 degrees normal operating temp of a diesel or any other engine. giving it a delay not to kick in at higher speeds, your aircond condensor will also increase the radiator temp bringing the clutch on sooner than normal

thats my assumption that it would only engage at operating temperature

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Feb 16, 2007 10:57 pm 
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I'll part the housing again and check. A bit hazy on the specifics, off the top of my head, but here's a pic for the moment:

Image

The front section of those two in the other picture above, (the one on the right with the screws circled), is this plate that I've posted. The bimetallic strip is anchored on the outside of the hub between those upright pillars on the housing. The other end is anchored to the centre pin of the bimetallic spring. That centre pin goes through a sealed bearing in the front of the hub to that black plate that you can see in that top right pic, to which the other end of the pin is anchored. That black metal strip then sits between these two set of columns on the back of this plate. When you loosen off those screws and rotate the plate, you are altering the tension via the centre pin of the bimetallic spring. Can't remember which way is for which, but if you loosen off those screws, (after marking their initial position), moving one way will make the plate try to return slightly. That's the way for decreasing the cut in temperature point, I believe. Either that or try to work it out by looking at the spring itself and figure out which way you need to rotate the plate to tension it. Sorry my theories a bit fuzzy. It's been a while since I diddled with the fan. :D Will post some further info later.


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 Post subject: Measuring
PostPosted: Fri Feb 16, 2007 11:34 pm 
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85C sounds like it might be a bit high. If the bi-metal strip works on the air coming through the radiator, then the radiator would have to be above 85C in order to heat the air coming through it.

Next time I have the fan off I'm going to pop the clutch in some water on the stove and slowly heat it. I have a candy making thermometer that goes to 120C (I use it for biodiesel production). I'll report back what I find.

I read up on another forum about a fellow that tried a brand new viscous clutch on his Landcruiser and also a fixed plate mount. The viscous fan clutch would allow the temperature guage to rise (on a big steep hill), but the fixed plate mount for the fan kept the temperature down. I'm wondering if the 'clutch' in these viscous fans really do lock up solid and spin the fan at the full pulley rate.

Matt, when you adjusted the clutch, could you get a positive lock on the clutch or was there a bit of slippage?


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 Post subject: Re: Measuring
PostPosted: Sat Feb 17, 2007 12:34 am 
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Terry Syd wrote:
Matt, when you adjusted the clutch, could you get a positive lock on the clutch or was there a bit of slippage?


The only way to stop any slip is to lock the back plate, either by bolting through the housing or chemical means, i.e: epoxy or silicone.

These are the pics of the internals:

Image
Image

The brass bolts in the rear housing are how I locked mine up. :D Looking at the front, that front friction plate bolts directly to the housing, so that one does not move at all. All that front friction plate does is alter the bimetallic spring tension. That black metal strip sits in the bits arrowed in the housing. The metal strip connected to the bimetallic strip is made of some form of spring metal, so must expand and contract to some degree as the unit cools/warms. The rings in the front plate slot inbetween the slots in the rear plate, with only a very fine clearance between them. As to exactly how the bimetallic part works the system, I'm not 100% sure, but it must merely transfer the heat to the front clutch palte and the fluid. As the viscous fluid heats, it merely creates more drag between those two sets of rings which are inter slotted on the front/back plates.


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 Post subject: Re: Measuring
PostPosted: Sat Feb 17, 2007 12:54 am 
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Terry Syd wrote:
I'm wondering if the 'clutch' in these viscous fans really do lock up solid and spin the fan at the full pulley rate.


I don't believe they do. There is always a small amount of slip. I think they go to a max of about 85- 90% of pully speed. Mine very rarely reaches this stage and apart from one occasion going up the Toowoomba Range when the gauge went past half way I have had no overheating problems.

Nev

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 Post subject: Variable fan clutch
PostPosted: Sat Feb 17, 2007 2:16 pm 
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By the sounds of it, a fan clutch that could be manually locked out for uphill climbs or other heavy work would be a nice item to have available. I could have used that extra 10-15% of airflow the last time I was pulling a load on a stinking hot day up Bells Line road.

Anybody know of an accessory fan clutch that can be locked up manually?

I might be tempted to figure out a mod for a stock fan clutch....


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 Post subject: Fan clutch mod
PostPosted: Sat Feb 17, 2007 5:14 pm 
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Hmm, just took a look at the fan clutch. If I welded a plate on the shaft of the fan clutch and drilled some appropriate holes, I could bolt it directly to the fan clutch housing using the existing threaded holes in the fan clutch.

This would be a fairly easy area to access out on the road. If I needed a bit more cooling, I could slip in the bolts (maybe with a lock-nut on the bolt) and rigidly mount the fan clutch to spin at the pulley speed.

I wish I had an old fan clutch to experiment with - I'll have to check some wreckers.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Feb 17, 2007 7:05 pm 
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I do have a spare spare if you were still after one, I could pm you my details if you wanted to find out the postage costs I would be happy enough to part with it.

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 Post subject: Mods
PostPosted: Sat Feb 17, 2007 11:05 pm 
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Jazza, please email me - I'll pay for the postage!

I had a further think about the potential mod and I think I could set it up with a single bolt through the fan clutch shaft. Bonehead easy to hook-up or release.

Having giving this fan thing a bit of thought, simply putting a bigger Landcrusier fan on a clutch that may already be slipping seems illogical (its just going to slip more with the bigger fan). Maybe the better alternative is to maximise the efficiency of the existing fan/fan clutch. Once I can be sure that the fan clutch is not a problem, then I could go on to look at a bigger fan.


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 Post subject: Re: Mods
PostPosted: Sun Feb 18, 2007 1:28 pm 
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Terry Syd wrote:
I had a further think about the potential mod and I think I could set it up with a single bolt through the fan clutch shaft. Bonehead easy to hook-up or release.


Terry, how exactly would you do the above? Can't quite figure out what you mean. The shaft from the water pulley goes through a sealed bearing in the back of the housing, and then that rear friction plate is pressed onto the shaft. To lock the clutch, you need to lock the shaft and the rear housing together somehow.


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 Post subject: Mod
PostPosted: Sun Feb 18, 2007 2:18 pm 
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Matt, Jazza and I are communicating about him sending me an old fan clutch he has. Once I have that then I will be able to see if my idea (or an alternative) will work. I don't want to take mine off for a number of days to fiddle with it as I need it for work.

When I get his I'll try the temperature test and report the results. Then try adjusting the bi-metal switch and report those results.

What I have in mind for the one bolt lock-out mod is to put four longer bolts through the clutch housing. I would then attach two plates on the new 'threaded studs' (on opposite sides of the clutch housing). The attached plates would extend down towards the shaft. At the shaft, the plates would bend at 90 degrees and extend a short distance along the shaft (call them attachment tabs). A hole will be drilled through both tabs and the shaft so a single bolt can be used to lock the housing to the shaft.

There will be a small clearance between the tabs and the shaft so they don't rub when the clutch is free wheeling. A couple of washers can take up that clearance when it comes time to lock the fan with the bolt.

At least that is my idea at this point, after spending some time with the fan clutch that might change.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Feb 18, 2007 3:06 pm 
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I get your meaning now. Like a couple of L plates bolted to the back of the housing? Only thing that may be a problem is the shaft itself. The shaft, once you deduct for the recess for the water pump, only has around a quarter inch of solid metal before it goes into the fan housing. The recess for the front of the water pump takes up most of the internal length of the visible shaft. I've popped a pic up to try and show what I mean.

Image

Ignore the colour of the housing, BTW. :D


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Feb 18, 2007 3:16 pm 
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A side shot. The depth of those nuts is roughly the amount of shaft you have which is not used for the water pump recess.

Image


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 Post subject: That's flash!
PostPosted: Sun Feb 18, 2007 4:00 pm 
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Love the blue colour, is that an oxide finish or paint?

Yeah, I have to wait for the fan clutch to see what problems I may encounter. I want to avoid any welding if I can, it would make the mod easy for anyone else to do it that didn't have access to a welder.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Feb 18, 2007 4:14 pm 
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It's paint, but that particular one never took too well.


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 Post subject: Rant
PostPosted: Thu Mar 08, 2007 10:10 am 
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I received the clutch fan from Jazza and have done some preliminary work. First off, I have discovered that who ever put the Surf engine in my Hilux Ute did not put in the Surf fan shroud, fan or fan clutch. I have been running a fan that is actually smaller than the Surf fan. Further, the shape of the Surf clutch is different from that of the Ute clutch and my first impressions of how to make a simple lock-out mechanism cannot be done. It looks like I will have to weld some mounts on the hub mounting plate.

Now for a rant

One of my pet peeves is listening/reading about how to do something from people that don


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 Post subject: How it works
PostPosted: Thu Mar 08, 2007 11:08 am 
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The information I


Last edited by Terry Syd on Mon Mar 12, 2007 4:05 am, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject: Re: Rant
PostPosted: Thu Mar 08, 2007 11:17 am 
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Terry Syd wrote:
Further, the shape of the Surf clutch is different from that of the Ute clutch and my first impressions of how to make a simple lock-out mechanism cannot be done. It looks like I will have to weld some mounts on the hub mounting plate.


I wasn't exaggerating when I said you didn't have much to play with, was I. :D


Terry Syd wrote:
Now for a rant


You had me worried for a moment there. Just been checking my posts in this thread to make sure I hadn't dropped a bollock. :D


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 Post subject: Other threads
PostPosted: Thu Mar 08, 2007 12:59 pm 
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Matt, in an attempt to get further background on the fan clutch, I used the 'search' function and reviewed other threads.

If somebody uses language that qualifies their post like 'I think', or 'I am assuming', or I had another vehicle which may serve as an analogy - no problem, at least you have an idea about the quality of the information.

Its the statements of 'fact' that really gripe me, oh, an another one is ambiguous statements like "drill a bigger hole to give it more punch" (what's 'bigger', where do I drill, and what the hell is 'punch').


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 Post subject: A quick mod
PostPosted: Thu Mar 08, 2007 3:26 pm 
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It will be a little while before I complete the lock-out mod. In the mean time anybody with overheating problems could try this quick fix.

Take the fan off the clutch, open the clutch, loosen the two adjusting screws, let the pre-load on the bi-metal spring shift the adjusting plate to the end of the slot, tighten the adjusting screws, bolt the clutch back together, attach fan and bolt the assembly back on the engine.

This will allow the viscous clutch to 'come on' earlier with less heat.

Not a total fix, but it might help. I'm going to do it to my vehicle. Better too early, than a bit too late.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Mar 08, 2007 5:56 pm 
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Locking the fan completely will increase fuel consumption by at least 20%, maybe not as bad with a diesel, but I have proof to say that I have a work ute a petrol ford courier running a fixed hub fully locked fan( been pumped full with silicone) and it drinks fuel like nobody's buseiness specially at 110 klm,

ffuel consumption like 15-20l per 100lkms cruizing, its actually better at slower city speeds

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manual gearbox 30% 5th gear overdrive
monster 55mm alloy rad, 10 blade fan, modified fan hub, 2nd aux radiator with thermofan in rear
w2a intercooler with dedicated a/c water chiller
lpg gas injection

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Mar 09, 2007 3:36 am 
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jazza wrote:
Locking the fan completely will increase fuel consumption by at least 20%, maybe not as bad with a diesel, but I have proof to say that I have a work ute a petrol ford courier running a fixed hub fully locked fan( been pumped full with silicone) and it drinks fuel like nobody's buseiness specially at 110 klm,

ffuel consumption like 15-20l per 100lkms cruizing, its actually better at slower city speeds


Can't say as I ever noticed that amount of difference to fuel consumption. I only ran the locked fan for a few hundred K's, but 5% would probably be closer to the mark, if that much. I never did specific measurements, but I honestly can't remember much difference in fuel consumption.

Whilst we're on the subject of the viscous fan, what might be a stupid question, if I may? Does the viscous unit act as a dampener/ballast for engine vibration to a small degree? I'll get ready for the verbal kicking to that one. :D


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Mar 09, 2007 3:43 am 
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Glad you managed to figure out the specifics Terry. :) That metal piece attached to the bimetal spring, in the front of the housing, always intrigued me as to what exactly it did.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Mar 09, 2007 8:19 am 
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Very well said Terry, syd,

I too get very peeved at some posts which do not instruct you clearly how to do a certain mod. I also have seen posts which have unrealistic claims!
I think jazza's post claiming 20% extra fuel consumption should be posted on the mythbusters site. As we all should be aware by now from the various mods that have been discovered and discussed we can definately conclude that just because a manufacturer has designed a car in a specific way does not necessarily mean it functions to the advantage of the engine to it's full potential. Obviously care should be taken whenever completing a mod and research of some kind should be taken before taking any mod on. I am particularly interested in the locking of the fan mod as I have had to deal with a cracked head on my motor and not a pretty situation to be in. :-({|= Although impressed with the heater in my truck I have noticed that when going up long hills the heater kicks out a considerable amount of extra heat, but havn't noticed any increase in engine temp according to the gauge but would like the satisfaction of knowing that the fan is cooling to it's max and only locking it up would do that.
Changing the subject slightly but relevant to ravish claims is the addition of Acetone to the fuel. I used to run a ldv van diesel with added acetone and it made a very noticeable difference in performance and power, but having tried this in my toyota it made little difference if any. It did definately make the engine more smother and quieter but as for performance I think it let it down rather than give it any boost. After watching mythbusters and their test on acetone additive they say it used up more fuel but did not test for extra power. I think more testing should be done to see if there are any benefits if any in the near future.

Chris

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 Post subject: Clutch fluid
PostPosted: Sat Mar 10, 2007 10:44 pm 
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I went to the wreckers today and picked up an 1HZ fan and another LN130 fan clutch (all for $60).

I am reshaping the fan so it will go on, I'll put the method I used in the other thread on 80 Series fan.

The LN130 clutch is from the same manufacturer (Aisin) as the one Jazza sent me, but it is shaped different. It would be even harder to build a lock-out device on it.

Now the revelation. I took my Ute fan clutch off and had it next to the Surf clutch and compared the resistance. The Ute clutch has MORE resistance. No matter which way I turn the Surf clutch to get more fluid into the ribs, the little LN85 clutch still has more resistance. This LN85 clutch is a lot smaller, but it has about twice the resistance.

I read on another forum, somewhere, that there are different viscosities of fluid available for the clutch. Does anybody have any information about that?


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 Post subject: Re: Clutch fluid
PostPosted: Sat Mar 10, 2007 10:48 pm 
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Terry Syd wrote:
I read on another forum, somewhere, that there are different viscosities of fluid available for the clutch. Does anybody have any information about that?


I know this may sound weird, but your best place to get advice on the fluids may actually be a R/C model shop. Apparently, they use various viscosities of silicone fluid for R/C kit.


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 Post subject: This forum!
PostPosted: Sat Mar 10, 2007 11:19 pm 
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I found it, it was on this forum. A bloke with the handle of 'Duecer' had been through the fluid issue.

Apparently the manual calls for 50ml of 3000Cst weight fluid, the 10,000 weight oil gives a firmer 'lock-up'.

The part number for the stock fluid is 08816-03001, the thicker fluid part number is 08816-10001. With the 18ml bottles you need 2.7 bottles.

Looks like the clutch I have contains the stock fluid.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Mar 11, 2007 12:17 am 
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I believe cSt is the correct way it should be written and also believe it to be "Centistokes @ 50 Centigrade"

The larger the number the higher the viscosity at the above temperature. The viscosity changes with temperature. These changes in temperature I believe will increase viscosity below and above the cSt temperature.

Difficult to explain but what I'm trying to say is when the engine is cold the viscosity will be greater and cause the clutch to have more resistance. As the engine warms up heat transfer will cause the silicon oil to thin to some extent. This decreases resistance after a short time. Once the engine has reached a certain temperature the oil will again thicken. I know the clutch has valving operated by the bi-metal strip but maybe it is a combination of valve opening and viscosity at work and not just oil volume.

As for the fan "locking up" is does happen but only to its design capacity. It happens with mine on occasions. This is not at 100% of pully rotation though because of the slip built into the design.

My thoughts anyway so take it or leave it.

Nev

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 Post subject: Inner workings
PostPosted: Sun Mar 11, 2007 1:24 am 
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Nev, I spent some time looking at the various holes in the device and after considering what would be happening during the dynamics of it spinning, I have a better idea about how it works.

There are three separate chambers; the inner, middle and outer chambers. The inner chamber is closest to the engine and it contains the 50ml reservoir of fluid. The middle chamber has the


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PostPosted: Sun Mar 11, 2007 8:42 am 
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Terry Ive heard that the silicone fluid is expensive stuff so dont miss when your pouring it in,

If you can come to a certain amount of fluid for better results, I may do the same as well as changing to an eight blade cruiser fan that has the rounded edges, These are the best toyota fan available as they dont flex nearly as much as the flat type, and slightly mod the shroud to accept the inch extra blade surface(without cutting the blades) the clutchs look identical from cruizer to hilux so it may well be the amount of fluid each clutch is using.

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 Post subject: Amount of fluid
PostPosted: Mon Mar 12, 2007 3:22 am 
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Jazza, your right about the Cruiser clutch being the same size as the Surf clutch. However, it is NOT the AMOUNT of fluid in the clutch that would make a difference in resistance - it would have to be the VISCOSITY.

When I go to the Toyota dealer to get the fluid, I will ask what viscosity is used in the Cruiser clutch.

Because of the way the clutch is designed, there is a range of amount of fluid the clutch can properly operate. That range may be something like 35 - 65 cc. If you put in an amount that is outside that range, then it will not use the 'L' port for the control of the fluid flow.


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 Post subject: Trying it out
PostPosted: Tue Mar 13, 2007 7:43 am 
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The issue of what silicon fluid to put in the clutch fan has been solved by Toyota Australia


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 13, 2007 7:05 pm 
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So was the fluid expensive Terry ?

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 Post subject: Cost
PostPosted: Tue Mar 13, 2007 8:29 pm 
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$33 - $11 per tube.


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 Post subject: Re: Trying it out
PostPosted: Tue Mar 13, 2007 9:27 pm 
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Quote:
Terry Syd - After taking it up a steep hill full throttle and heating up the engine, then checking it, the fan is engaged. I took a long drive through traffic, when I stopped the fan was engaged.


Hi Guys - my first post - this is an AWESOME site! I have been following the thread about the viscous fan and will definitely change to the "10,000" silicon. I will also wire up a dashboard lamp to the aux electric fan so I can see when things are heating up. But I am a bit worried about the viscous fan right now - I took it for a "hard" drive today, and when I stopped the engine I could still easily turn the fan by hand - is this right or should there be a lot of resistance? Sorry about the stupid question but I have never had a viscous fan before.

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 Post subject: Re: Trying it out
PostPosted: Tue Mar 13, 2007 10:07 pm 
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Ratty wrote:
Hi Guys - my first post - this is an AWESOME site! I have been following the thread about the viscous fan and will definitely change to the "10,000" silicon.


Toyota Australia only stock the 3000cSt according to Terry. These are the part numbers for 3000 - 6000 and 10000 cSt.

Image

08816-03001, 08816-06001, and 08816-10001 Maybe only available ex Japan for the 6000 and 10000.

As mentioned before higher viscosity Silicon Oil maybe available at rc retailers.

Ratty wrote:
I am a bit worried about the viscous fan right now - I took it for a "hard" drive today, and when I stopped the engine I could still easily turn the fan by hand - is this right or should there be a lot of resistance? Sorry about the stupid question but I have never had a viscous fan before.


When the engine is really hot give the fan a quick flick (engine off of course) with the fingers. It should stop quickly. If it turns more than a couple of blades it may need attention. Another test is to watch the fan as the engine is switched off. It should also stop quickly and not continue to spin with the centrifugal force.

Nev

[/img]

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 Post subject: Trying it Out
PostPosted: Wed Mar 14, 2007 11:18 am 
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Many Thanks Nev - I tested this - when the engine is hot and is turned off the fan stops spinning almost immediately. And, if I "flick" it, it does not spin by itself at all. So, looking good!

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Replaced:
Injectors, Fuel Pump, Alternator, Starter, Condensor Fan


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 Post subject: 10,000 fluid
PostPosted: Wed Mar 14, 2007 3:38 pm 
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I went to Castle Hill Toyota, it was there that they said Toyota only provide the 10,000 weight. Maybe other dealerships carry some of the lighter fluids.

"Terry Syd - After taking it up a steep hill full throttle and heating up the engine, then checking it, the fan is engaged. I took a long drive through traffic, when I stopped the fan was engaged."

I should clarify the above statement - in both cases I stopped the vehicle, but left the engine running. I then popped the bonnet, got ahold of the throttle linkage and revved the engine while looking at the fan. When the clutch is disengaged the engine revs, but the fan doesn't accelerate. When the clutch is engaged the fan speed follows the engine speed.


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 Post subject: Checking for disengagement
PostPosted: Wed Mar 14, 2007 3:48 pm 
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If you want to check that the fan can disengage, then try this. In the morning fire up the engine and take it for a short drive. As soon as the engine is up to temperature, pull over and check (with the engine running) if the fan is engaged/disengaged by revving the engine.

At that point the water in the engine block is up to temperature, but the water in the radiator is still cool. Since the air coming through the radiator is still cool the bi-metal strip will not have started expanding. Rev the engine a couple of times while looking at the fan. The engine should rev freely and the fan will not speed up with the revving of the engine.

You need to run the engine that short bit at first in order to remove the fluid from the ribs in the clutch.


Last edited by Terry Syd on Wed Mar 14, 2007 8:12 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject: Re: Trying it out
PostPosted: Wed Mar 14, 2007 4:57 pm 
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NiftyNev wrote:
Ratty wrote:
Hi Guys - my first post - this is an AWESOME site! I have been following the thread about the viscous fan and will definitely change to the "10,000" silicon.


Toyota Australia only stock the 3000cSt according to Terry. These are the part numbers for 3000 - 6000 and 10000 cSt.

08816-03001, 08816-06001, and 08816-10001 Maybe only available ex Japan for the 6000 and 10000.

As mentioned before higher viscosity Silicon Oil maybe available at rc retailers.

Ratty wrote:
I am a bit worried about the viscous fan right now - I took it for a "hard" drive today, and when I stopped the engine I could still easily turn the fan by hand - is this right or should there be a lot of resistance? Sorry about the stupid question but I have never had a viscous fan before.


When the engine is really hot give the fan a quick flick (engine off of course) with the fingers. It should stop quickly. If it turns more than a couple of blades it may need attention. Another test is to watch the fan as the engine is switched off. It should also stop quickly and not continue to spin with the centrifugal force.

Nev



Oops. Got the numbers the wrong way round. Sorry about that.

Nev

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