Toyota 4WD Surf Owners • View topic - V8 1uzfe into 4Runner Project

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 Post subject: V8 1uzfe into 4Runner Project
PostPosted: Wed Mar 04, 2009 6:26 pm 
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PART 1: INTRODUCTION AND PLANNING

G


Last edited by earthman on Tue May 24, 2011 9:22 am, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Wed Mar 04, 2009 6:35 pm 
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PLANNING

I had to face facts. My vehicle had done almost 300000 kms of hard driving and I knew there would soon be a time to bite the bullet: Either sell the old mule and get a new vehicle or choose the road less travelled and get a new motor.

Getting a new vehicle meant starting from scratch and rebuilding it with all the accessories (bullbar, lights, tyres, suspension etc etc etc).

Getting a new motor meant I kept old faithful and all the accessories and, theoretically, would work out a whole lot cheaper. Theoretically. The downside being that the vehicle would be worth a lot less. But, in a glass half full moment I figured how much less can a 15 year old vehicle get in value?

So in a pre-emptive strike on the tired old asthmatic V6 3vze donkey plonker, I decided to replace it before one of it


Last edited by earthman on Mon May 30, 2011 8:28 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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PostPosted: Wed Mar 04, 2009 6:35 pm 
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TIMELINE



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PostPosted: Wed Mar 04, 2009 6:38 pm 
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MATERIALS, PARTS, TOOLS and SUNDRIES


After conducting months of research on these forums and talking to mechanics I spent up to a year obtaining the following materials:

PARTS



Last edited by earthman on Mon May 30, 2011 8:28 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Thu Mar 05, 2009 8:29 am 
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good work earthman... u have come to the right place!!

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1990 Toyota Surf
1UZ-FE V8 FOURCAM 32
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...because the earth isn't flat

My 1uzfe Conversion
My Surf


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PostPosted: Sat Mar 07, 2009 1:15 pm 
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dar_sbb wrote:
good work earthman... u have come to the right place!!


I Know!!! There is some awesome info in this forum you just don't get anywhere else!!!! More than happy to contribute!!!! \:D/


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PostPosted: Sat Mar 07, 2009 1:17 pm 
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Part 2: WORK COMPLETED BEFORE THE ENGINE WENT INTO THE VEHICLE


PRE- CONVERSION WORK ON ENGINE: Body Lift

2 inch body lift completed


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PostPosted: Sat Mar 07, 2009 1:20 pm 
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PRE- CONVERSION WORK ON ENGINE: Inspection of freshly acquired motor

I received the engine and gearbox from SSS Auomotive (Girraween, Sydney) and went over them carefully to see if there were any parts missing or damaged. SSS Automotive a couple of little things with zero hassle. I also got them to undo the big bolt at the centre of the tail shaft on the 1uzfe gear box with a rattle gun so that I could get the gear box tail piece off. I could then fit the transfer adapter from the Toyota Surf on the end.

When I took the valve covers off I was amazed at how clean the cams and internals were. ~100,000kms and they almost glowed in the late afternoon light and looked like had just rolled out the factory door. They were only a tiny bit dirty at the rear of the left (passenger) side. I have since found that this was due to a faulty PCV valve that goes on the top of the valve cover. All fixed now though.

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PostPosted: Sat Mar 07, 2009 1:21 pm 
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PRE-CONVERSION WORK ON ENGINE: Engine Bay Layout

Before I began I had made plans on how the engine bay should look. Things that I did include:



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PostPosted: Sat Mar 07, 2009 1:26 pm 
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PRE-CONVERSION WORK ON ENGINE: Powder Coating

In a rice power moment I took off the plenum and valve covers, cleaned them and took them to the powder coaters for an orange coat to make the motor look like a Husqvarna chainsaw. The plan was that the orange coat was going to give me at least another 20-30 horsepower simply by looking good (yeah, right!).

Unfortunately that did not transpire as the coating has since started flaking off. Even though I gave them a decent scrub, I don


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PostPosted: Sat Mar 07, 2009 1:32 pm 
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I did these for fun in case anyone is interested in what other colours would look like. In case you were wondering a purple, pink or green powder coat was never in the mix for my vehicle. The others don


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PostPosted: Sat Mar 07, 2009 1:33 pm 
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PRE-CONVERSION WORK ON ENGINE: Plugs, Distributors and Leads

While the engine was sitting on the floor I took off the accessory belt then replaced the distributor caps and rotors, installed new spark plugs (NGK BKR6E-11). I replaced the rather long accessory belt with one that cost me about $60.00 from an Auto store. Replaced the spark plug leads with new ones. I am glad I did this while the engine was out of the car as the long solid section of the spark plug lead on cylinder 8 comes very close to the brake booster cylinder when the engine is installed. May take a bit of work to get at the plug. Has anyone else with a 1uz in a 4runner/surf/hilux had this problem?


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PostPosted: Mon Mar 09, 2009 11:46 pm 
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Nope, my engine is mounted quite low to retain the original driveshaft angles and I can get no8 out with a bit of "profanity", yet it's no worse than most jap V type engine factory installations to get at the rear most plug. Pity you didn't keep it manual, now that I've solved the clutch problems and gotten everything to work properly they are certainly fun but really need R154 ratios behind the 8. And it's all V6 4runner in the clutch department now, right down to the clutch fork pivot height

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Petrol and Diesel Mechanic by trade

Hers 1992 SSR-X 2door wide body
His. 1990 UZN130 SSR Limited. 1UZ-FE, 5 speed manual, Updated to SSR-G spec
Daughters car 1982 RN41 hilux ute with Surf bits
His junior... Buzz Lightyear electric Quad
Mr Dog..Any car with door open


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 10, 2009 6:39 pm 
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4th surf: Thanks mate, I think I should be OK, [-o< the body lift helps but it just looks pretty damn close!!! These 90 degree angled motors sure like to spread themselves out and make themselves at home in the engine bay. yeah, it was a toss up whether to go manual or auto with this one, but since my vehicle was an auto to begin with I thought I may as well keep it that way and try to save some $$$$ - At least that was the theory. I ended up adapting a manual shifting tcase, instead of using the electronic button shift type with the electric motor on the back due to technical hassles, but more on that one later......


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 10, 2009 6:44 pm 
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PRE-CONVERSION WORK ON ENGINE: Timing Belt and Hydraulic Fan Idler Pulley Replacement

I replaced the timing belt while the engine was out of the car. I won't go into it as you can see various forum entries on Lextreme or the engine manual for this procedure. I set aside a whole day for this procedure. Probably a good idea to replace the water pump on the front of the engine at this stage too, as the only way to replace it is to replace the timing belt. Here are two very handy Lextreme resources on this:

http://www.lextreme.com/timing.htm
http://www.lextreme.com/timing2.html

While reassembling the front of the engine after the timing belt replacement, I replaced the Hydraulic Fan bracket with an Idler Pulley bracket. I was not going to use the Hydraulic fan but install a thermo fan instead. I didn


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 10, 2009 6:46 pm 
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PRE-CONVERSION WORK ON ENGINE: Oil Pressure Sensor and the water temperature sensor

I replaced the Oil Pressure Sensor and the water temperature sensor with ones from a V6 4runner so that outputs are compatible with the gauges on the 4runner dash. I will probably get a more accurate water temp gauge at some stage.

I had to solder on an old lead plug for the older 4runner water temperature sensor, then re-taped the wire and reinstalled at the front of the engine.


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 10, 2009 6:48 pm 
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PRE- CONVERSION WORK ON ENGINE: Plenum Reverse and Valve Covers

I picked up the Powder Coated parts and replaced them on the engine, using new valve cover gaskets, spark plug gaskets, and intake manifold gaskets. Then went and bought various hoses needed due to the plenum reverse. Thankfully there is no EGR system on the plenum which would have complicated the plenum reverse. This later 1996-97 Celsior engine also does not have a cold start injector (CSI) which normally is attached to the bottom centre of the plenum. The absence of the CSI made it easier.


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PostPosted: Wed Mar 11, 2009 7:18 pm 
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Enjoying this read. You are going down the same path I was thinking for the missus 3.slow.
Im really hoping to learn from this.
Are you still running air conditioning?


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PostPosted: Wed Mar 11, 2009 9:30 pm 
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MAV50L: The Missus will love it!!!!!! Install a 2.5 inch exhaust with a hot dog near the tip and she'll also love explaining what the go is to guys who hear it then pull up next to her at traffic lights and ask her what the hell she has got under the bonnet. The sound is pretty good, I drive around town pretending I am in a Lancaster Bomber busting dams, LOL.

The funny thing with the 1uzi is that I find it as or more fuel efficient than the asthmatic 3.slow donkey plonker it replaced. So you could try to use raw economics to convince her! I also run LPG and there is very little noticeable loss of power.

I kept pretty careful notes on what I did and why. I just don't want to info-dump it all on here at once. I am trying to spread it out a bit for you guys to comment, catch up etc...

But if you were going to do a 1uzi swap I would recommend you do plenty of planning and reading on toyotasurf.com and lextreme, spend a few months collecting all the bits you need, don't skimp out on engine cooling, and (unless you do the conversion yourself) expect the mechanics to have your car for several months so your missus may need alternative transport in the meantime. I did a bunch of prep work on the car, motor, gearbox and tcase and the mechanics still had my car for almost 5 months as they don't make much money on conversions and were doing it when they had no other work on. And there was still a whole bunch of stuff to do after I got the vehicle back.

Yes I did keep air con, but it isn't working at the moment because the mechanics got some guy to install it and he left a leak somewhere. I'll have to get someone to chase it down with dies etc. He also had the condenser fan polarity wrong so it sucked hot air back through the radiator!


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PostPosted: Wed Mar 11, 2009 9:38 pm 
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PRE-CONVERSION WORK ON ENGINE: ISC, TPS and AFM Wiring

I am swapping/reversing the plenum around to the passenger (left) side to rig the snorkel and LPG system back up, so I re-routed the wires for the AFM (air flow metre), ISC (idle speed controller) and TPS (throttle position sensor) from the driver


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PostPosted: Wed Mar 11, 2009 9:41 pm 
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PRE-CONVERSION WORK ON ENGINE: Idle Speed Controller (Isc) Inlet Hose

The ISC (normally at the front of the plenum) is now at the rear of the plenum due to the plenum reverse. The ISC inlet hose was plumbed to the large nozzle under the throat of the throttle so that the air/gas mixture is still drawn in during idle.

The ISC hose also rubbed on the metal heater hose tube that runs from the front of the engine near the water pump and beneath the intake manifold to the back of the engine. This metal hose had to be bent slightly by the mechanics so that the ISC hose and heater hose did not clash.
Image Image


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PostPosted: Fri Mar 13, 2009 8:52 pm 
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PRE-CONVERSION WORK ON ENGINE: ISC and Throttle Coolant Line Modification

I deleted the coolant line that runs from the front of the engine through the throttle and then through the ISC. When I turned the plenum around 180 degrees part of the coolant inlet on the bottom of the ISC fouled against the plastic loom cover at the rear of the engine. The purpose for this coolant pass through on the ISC is apparently keeping it warm and from freezing in colder climates. Since I am in sunny Australia I decided to delete it from the cooling system. Both the ISC and throttle was deleted from the line. The part that was fouling on the engine cover was ground off.

This coolant line began at the front of the engine on the coolant crossover pipe and ended at the back of the engine on a nozzle sticking out of the rear coolant crossover pipe between the heads. Which brings me to my next step


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PostPosted: Fri Mar 13, 2009 8:55 pm 
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PRE-CONVERSION WORK ON ENGINE: Rear coolant crossover pipe mod

As mentioned there is a coolant line that runs from the front of the engine near the water pump, through the ISC and the throttle then re-enters the cooling system on the rear crossover pipe. When the engine was installed this nozzle bumped against the hand brake bracket on the fire wall.

Because I had deleted the throttle and ISC lines from the cooling system I did not need the nozzle on the rear coolant crossover pipe. I had it cut off completely and the hole was tig welded over. This created a little more room around the rear of the engine. This, in a 1UZ to 4runner swap where you are fighting for millimetres, is a huge gap. The result is greater clearance, no more vibrations. The pictures show what nozzle I am talking about and how much room cutting this thing off creates.


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PostPosted: Fri Mar 20, 2009 10:15 pm 
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PRE- CONVERSION WORK ON ENGINE: Throttle and throttle cables

The whole point of the plenum reverse was to swap the throttle from the drivers (right) side to the passengers (left) side so it would sit neatly in line with the snorkel and LPG setup. After some careful reading on various forums the original (Toyota Celsior) Throttle was replaced with an early 1990s US/ left hand drive Toyota soarer SC400 throttle.

I bought the US SC400 throttle from Ebay/the states. This early throttle does not have the extra trac-control butterfly in the throat so it is simpler, and most importantly, because it is from a left hand drive car it has the cables pulling from the opposite side. The advantage of this is so when you reverse the plenum like I have they pull from the driver


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PostPosted: Fri Mar 20, 2009 10:17 pm 
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PRE-CONVERSION WORK ON ENGINE: Plenum Vacuum Hoses

Due to plenum reverse many of the air hoses had to be re routed.



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PostPosted: Fri Mar 20, 2009 10:18 pm 
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PRE-CONVERSION WORK ON ENGINE: PCV Valve

Had to install new PCV valve grommet in the valve cover as the old one was hard and cracked too easily when I removed it for the powder coating. In Australia this is part number 90480


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PostPosted: Fri Mar 20, 2009 10:20 pm 
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PRE-CONVERSION WORK ON ENGINE: Steering Damper Bracket Issues

For this type of swap the steering damper MUST be relocated as it slices into the oil sump if it is not moved. There is no way around it unless you want the engine to be sticking out of the bonnet by about half a foot.

Luckily Rancho make a steering damper relocator kit (steering damper and damper relocator kit product numbers are RS5402 and 5573 respectively) so this step was very easy. The relocate kit is a direct bolt on to existing bolts and holes. You may have to cut the steering damper knuckle on the drag link though so it won


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PostPosted: Mon Mar 23, 2009 4:54 pm 
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PRE-CONVERSION WORK ON A341E GEAR BOX

Probably the most complicated part of the swap (complicated for me anyway) has been the adaptation of a transfer case to the 1uzfe auto gear box. This was achieved by getting a Toyota Surf auto box (the kind with the electric engaging manual shifting transfer case) and joining the transfer case to the 1uzfe auto box.

I followed this process from others who have gone before me and posted their (excellent) ideas on the net. I will go through the process that I followed but I would suggest that you look at the following sites as I basically copied what they did and they have much better info and pictures.

Madmont: http://lextreme.com/forums/showthread.p ... tput+rotor

Duza: http://www.4wdmonthly.com.au/forum/show ... post693678

Some good info from Cebby too at: http://www.lextreme.com/forums/showthread.php?p=34828

There were several major steps to this process. These were:

1. Drilling/locating new speed sensor on transfer adapter housing
2. Cutting the output shaft
3. Cutting and fixing the 4 prong speed sensor rotor
4. Assembling the Gearbox/transfer combination.
5. Creating transfer case relay panel


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PostPosted: Mon Mar 23, 2009 5:01 pm 
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PRE-CONVERSION WORK ON A341E GEAR BOX: Drilling/locating new speed sensor on transfer adapter housing

A. Removed the speed sensor from the Lexus Gearbox tail housing. It is short, fat and 14.9mm in diameter

B. Removed the speed sensor from the Surf transfer adapter. It is long, skinny and 12mm in diameter.

C. Put the Toyota Surf transfer adapter on the rear of the Lexus Gearbox and looked into hole to see how the rotor was positioned. It was right beneath the hole.

D. Measured the distance from the hole to the face of the Lexus tail piece and the distance from the hole to the face of the transfer adapter. Almost Identical.

E. Measured distance needed between Speed Sensor Rotor and Speed Sensor, approximately 1mm to 2mm.

F. Drilled hole in Surf Transfer Adapter out to 15mm so that it would accommodate new Lexus speed sensor. Also drilled and tapped a smaller hole near by for the retainer bolt that holds the speed sensor in.

G. Used a piece of blu-tac to see how far away the new speed sensor comes. Pretty close, about 1mm. A pretty low tech method, I know, but it worked. The rotor and speed sensor came within about 1mm to 2mm of each other. I added a 1mm spacer (washer) under the speed sensor just to be sure. I could always remove the spacer and bring them closer if this is too far.

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PostPosted: Mon Mar 23, 2009 5:04 pm 
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PRE-CONVERSION WORK ON A341E GEAR BOX: Cutting the output shaft

A. Carefully measured output shaft on surf gearbox (68mm)

B. Carefully measured the same distance on the output shaft on the Lexus gearbox

C. Cut output shaft of the Lexus gearbox so that it was the same length as the output shaft on the Toyota Surf gearbox. It is now ready to accept the transfer case.

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PostPosted: Mon Mar 23, 2009 5:06 pm 
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PRE-CONVERSION WORK ON A341E GEAR BOX: Tapping a hole in the gearbox case

At this stage I should have tapped a hole in the centre of the gearbox shell, as outlined by Madmont in this thread: http://lextreme.com/forums/showthread.p ... tput+rotor

At the time I was a bit lazy and did not bother and as a result there is a small tranny oil leak between the gearbox and the transfer case adapter/extension housing as the two bottom bolts are quite far apart, too far in fact to form an effective seal even with decent gasket goop. I


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 01, 2009 2:01 pm 
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PRE-CONVERSION WORK ON A341E GEAR BOX: Cutting and fixing the 4 prong speed sensor rotor

1. I removed the tail piece of the Lexus gearbox.

2. Removed transfer case and transfer adapter from the Toyota Surf Gearbox.

3. Measured the distance of the Surf Speed Sensor rotor and cut the 4 pronged Lexus one at the same length(on these boxes it was 38.1mm).

4. Tapped 4 x 6mm holes on the 4 pronged speed sensor rotor and installed 4 hex grub screws so that it would not slip about on the output shaft

5. Installed the Speed sensor rotor back on the output shaft, tightened grub screws up with some loctite. I put Loctite on the grub screws as they are apparently prone to coming loose. I have had a speed sensor on a Toyota malfunction before and it is not fun and was expensive (See below)


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 01, 2009 2:02 pm 
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With regards to speed sensors, I discovered the hard way how important they are to Toyota engine management systems.

I had a vibration/shudder problem at about 80km and it took me months to chase the problem down. It ended up being something that is easily overlooked when you are checking out drive shafts and the like.

The centre nut on the companion flange where the drive shaft is joined to the transfer case was loose by a very small amount, yet it was enough to create the vibration and I am pretty sure it cost me a speed sensor plus a lot of time and money. This nut is the big 30mm thing right at the centre of the flange that attaches to the output shaft in the transfer case. You can only get to it by removing the 4 drive shaft nuts and taking the drive shaft out.

The vibrations were driving me nuts and I chased everything to find what it was, rotated tyres etc. But I didn


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 01, 2009 2:03 pm 
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PRE-CONVERSION WORK ON A341E GEAR BOX: Other Gearbox Issues

I tried to replace the oil pan on the 1uz transmission with the one off the Toyota Surf transmission for extra transmission fluid and cooling capacity but due to differing sized internals/valve body the Surf one did not fit. Bugger. I had the mechanics install a tranny cooler at the back above the gas tank to help compensate and keep the tranny oil cool.


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 01, 2009 2:04 pm 
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PRE-CONVERSION WORK ON A341E GEAR BOX: Assembling the Gearbox/transfer combination

1. With the Speed Sensor Rotor fixed on the output shaft and the Speed sensor bolted into the Transfer Adapter, I bolted the transfer adapter to the Lexus gearbox, using the torque specs in a repair manual: 34 N-m (345kgf-cm, 25 ft-lbf).

2. Bolted the transfer case back to the transfer adapter using the torque specs in a repair manual: 34 N-m (345kgf-cm, 25 ft-lbf).

3. Installed the Transfer case gearstick.


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 01, 2009 2:07 pm 
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PRE-CONVERSION WORK ON TRANSFER CASE: Transfer Case and Transfer Case Issues

When I was first preparing the motor, prior to it being installed, I was going to use the Toyota Surf transfer electric shift Tcase (VF1AM type) as others had installed this with a good success rate. As well as the Tcase the sifter was needed, and also the wiring loom.

After installing this case and having several issues with the 4wd electric motor on the back I ended up swapping in a manual shifting transfer case (VF1A) from a hilux. I am much happier with the manual case as I believe it is a tad more reliable (not having the electric motor to rely on shifting into 4wd). The only drawback is that it needs to be in neutral to shift into 4wd and does not shift into 4wd on the fly. :-({|=


PRE-CONVERSION WORK ON TRANSFER CASE: Creating transfer case relay box and wiring

The Toyota Surf comes with a 4wd control box to control the motor on the back of the transfer case. Unfortunately I don


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 01, 2009 2:09 pm 
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PRE-CONVERSION WORK ON TRANSFER CASE: The switch from electric shift to manual shift and why.

The following process was completed after the engine was installed in the car but I have included it here so this build process story makes sense.

I had originally installed the electrical shifting Toyota surf transfer case (VF1AM type). This type of Tcase is identified by the electric motor on the back that helps it shift from 2wd to 4wd. As I did not have the full wiring loom and computer I made up a system of 6 relays that used the sensors on the transfer case. The motors turned out to be a real problem.

The first motor was already burnt out. I bought another one from the wreckers for about $150 and this one had a warped cog inside (which Toyota made in plastic rather than metal). This warpage meant that electric limit switch contact brushes had inconsistent contact with the metal plate on the surface. These contact brushes act as a limit switch inside the motor and tell the 4wd computer and/or relays when the transfer case has engaged 4wd or 2wd. The computer/relays then stop providing power to the motor so that it does not burn out. See illustrations for more details.

I go bush regularly and after two busted motors I started to imagine the recovery costs of being stuck in the middle of nowhere due to the failure of one of these units.

I did not know why this was; it could have been something to do with the way I set up the relays, although they seemed to work fine for a while. Maybe the 12v I was using to get the motor moving is too much for the motors? I couldn


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 01, 2009 2:12 pm 
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PRE-CONVERSION WORK ON TRANSFER CASE: Transfer case compatibility and adaptation

The VF1AM (electric shift) and the VF1A (manual shift) transfer cases are essentially the same, they have the same bolt pattern, similar internals and similar shell. The diagrams in the Toyota manuals show virtually no difference in the gearing internals between the two cases. The Surf VF1AM Transfer fitted up nicely to the 1uzfe gearbox too. So, logically, I assumed that the gearbox output shaft and Transfer case input shaft would be the same for the manual Hilux VF1A Tcase. WRONG!

The input shaft diameters on the two transfer cases (VF1A and VF1AM) were both 23 spline but have DIFFERENT DIAMETERS! The VF1A manual type was 28.2mm in diameter and the VF1AM (Surf) Electrical type was 30.4 in diameter. This was a significant setback. I didn


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 01, 2009 2:14 pm 
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PRE-CONVERSION WORK ON TRANSFER CASE: Adaptation of Tcase Shifter Levers

As I had just changed the transfer case from an electric shift to a manual shift, the shifter lever for the Tcase also had to be changed. The Surf VF1AM electric shift type had a plastic ball on the shift pin and a bend to go around the Auto shifter as it came up through the floor of the car almost directly beneath it. The Hilux VF1A manual type had a normal shift pin for the


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 01, 2009 2:15 pm 
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PRE-CONVERSION WORK ON TRANSFER CASE: Adaptation of Speed Sensors

There were other small adaptations to be made on the manual shifting VF1A Tcase as well.

Firstly the speed sensor on the back of the transfer case that drives the speedo in the dash was a cable driven one, this had to be swapped for an electrical one. This was not difficult and was a straight swap, as the housing and drive gear are identical. See illustration.

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PostPosted: Wed Apr 01, 2009 2:16 pm 
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PRE-CONVERSION WORK ON TRANSFER CASE: Wiring 4wd Dash light

This was simple. I wired up the green 4wd dash light to the switch and plug on the top of the tcase. One end was attached to the 4wd dash light wire and the other was earthed. Every time 4wd is engaged the wire is earthed and the friendly green 4wd dash light comes on as per normal.


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 01, 2009 2:17 pm 
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Part 3: ENGINE INSTALLATION

Everything I have written about so far (except the transfer case issues) was completed PRIOR to the installation of the engine. It was at this stage that I handed everything over to the Ben and Chris at Hi Tech 4x4 in Penrith, NSW.

Before deciding on a mechanic I did some asking around and spoke to several potential mechanics. I almost went with Scott at venom Cobra


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 01, 2009 2:21 pm 
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ENGINE INSTALLATION: Engine Mounting

Once the old engine was pulled out the guys at Hi tech 4x4 spent numerous hours sitting the 1uzfe in the engine bay and moving it about to find the best possible position. With an engine this size in an engine bay as small as the 4runners you are talking about being millimetre perfect


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 01, 2009 2:37 pm 
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ENGINE INSTALLATION: Accelerator Cable/Modifications

As I had put the American SC400 throttle on then reversed the plenum, the accelerator cables pulled from the correct side. The original cable from the pedal to the throttle was used but for the throttle to gearbox a cable from a Hilux LN series was apparently used (I think!!).


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 02, 2009 12:09 am 
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I see that they have used the original engine mount bracket and moved the ones on the chassis. I thought about this but chose not to alter the chassis from standard. I use 3Y engine mount brackets slightly massaged with the standard Surf chassis bracket and rubber mount. I had to weld a Foot onto them but this combination would be ideal for a V6 based conversion as the chassis brackets are further toward the rear than diesel models.

FYI the cable that you indicate is the "Kick down" for the trans, For reverse plenum set up with US throttle body you need the LN130 mechanical injector pump throttle cable as it is the correct length albeit needing some "fettling" to the inner cable to get the ratio correct

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PostPosted: Tue Apr 07, 2009 1:34 am 
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4th surf: Thanks for the info, it would be interesting to see photo's of all the different 1uz engine mounts back to back on the one thread. I have done heaps of reading around and as far as I can tell there is different engine mounts for every conversion! There does not seem to be a standard way of achieving it. I would have liked mounts that use poly-bushes but the 3vze mounts was the simplest route for the mechanics and the swap is complicated enough.

Thanks also for the info on exactly what cable it was. Should make it easy if I ever need a replacement.


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 07, 2009 4:13 pm 
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ENGINE INSTALLATION PROPER: Transmission Mounts

The guys at Hi tech welded a support bracket onto the gearbox support cross member lifting the gearbox two inches to work with body lift. This is great as it means the transfer and tranny sump are less likely to be smashed by rocks and debris. The plate that the transfer is mounted on was laser cut for accuracy. The photos below show how they did it.

Where the transfer case bolts to the support (4 bolts, 2 on each side) marks the point that normally sits directly over the cross member. As you can see from the photo


Last edited by earthman on Thu Apr 16, 2009 9:21 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Tue Apr 07, 2009 4:15 pm 
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ENGINE INSTALLATION PROPER: Exhaust

Crown


Last edited by earthman on Thu Apr 16, 2009 9:21 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Tue Apr 07, 2009 4:23 pm 
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ENGINE INSTALLATION PROPER: Cooling System Installation

Cooling, or lack there of, has been an issue for many guys doing this conversion due to the smallish engine bay creating restricted airflow. I did a fair bit of reading to see what other guys had done and discussed this at length with the guys from Hi Tech before I handed it the vehicle over to them for the conversion.

Before I took the vehicle to Hi Tech I had the winch box moved under the bonnet near the brake master cylinder. This normally sits smack in the middle of the bull bar in front of the radiator and robs it of air. Moving it inside the engine bay gives it a bit of protection as well as creates more airflow through the radiator.

Also before I handed it to Hi Tech I ordered from Scott at VENOM COBRAS in Qld an alloy radiator for about $700 that fits the 4runner. A pretty good price for an alloy really. It is apparently a Nascar quality AFCO Racing radiator. Scott was able to get the exit and entry holes welded on opposite sides as the V6 and V8 have their hoses on opposite sides. This radiator also had the support brackets welded half way along the tank.

During the installation, in a trick I first saw used by Nemesis, on his build-up of Nemesis 2, the new alloy radiator was recessed forward to create more room fo thermo fans between the engine and radiator. See nemesis


Last edited by earthman on Thu Apr 16, 2009 9:22 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Tue Apr 07, 2009 4:24 pm 
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ENGINE INSTALLATION PROPER: Strengthening bonnet support bar

Part of the top of the bonnet support bar had to be cut and (then reinforced at the insistence of the engineer) to allow for the radiator cap in this new setup.


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Last edited by earthman on Thu Apr 16, 2009 9:22 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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